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Municipal Training Institute

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Newly Elected Officials Institute
6 Credit Hours
State Mandated
Recommended for Newly Elected and First-Term Officials
The Newly Elected Officials Institute provides a general overview of the function of municipal government in Georgia and the roles and responsibilities of mayors and councilmembers. The class includes an introduction to key issues such as ethics, municipal finance, planning and zoning, open meetings, open records and parliamentary procedures. All municipal elected officials taking office since July 1, 1990 are required by state law to complete the Newly Elected Officials Institute.

Beyond the Beltway: Influencing Federal Policy through Grassroots Engagement
3 Credit Hours
Decisions made in Washington, D.C. on issues ranging from en¬vironmental regulations to tax reform and the federal budget have a direct impact on municipal operations. Federal policies may create unfunded mandates and result in unintended consequences. Local officials have a key role in influencing federal policy. By sharing information with federal leaders about local challenges and needs, federal leaders can make more informed decisions. This class provides information about Congress, federal agencies, and how municipal officials can engage most effectively with leaders at the federal level to advocate for municipal priorities. Participants obtain tips for communicating with members of Congress and engage in role playing exercises to hone their negotiating skills.

Building a Hometown Connection: GMA Lobbying 101
6 Credit Hours
This class provides an overview of the state legislative process and helps city officials understand how they can be effective advocates of issues important to their commu¬nity and cities throughout the state. Participants receive ideas for establishing productive year-round relationships with members of the General Assembly as well as practical lobbying tips they can use during the legislative session. The class also includes a hands-on exercise using real-life legislative scenarios.

Capital Improvement Program
3 Credit Hours
New Class
Available Online
Capital assets are essential for service delivery in local gov¬ernments. All governments should have a comprehensive capital improvement program (CIP) to renew and replace these capital assets. The class provides an overview of a CIP, including how a CIP is included in the annual budget. In addition, creating a CIP, incorporating capital asset requests and the decision-making process are discussed. Finally, discussion includes considerations in funding capital asset improvements.

Changing Demographics and Best Practices
3 Credit Hours
Georgia’s demographics are constantly shifting, impacting cities. Georgia’s population is getting older and increasingly representing the cultures of many nationalities and many interests. This class examines the cultural and aging trends in Georgia and explores the implications of these changing demographics for cities, both in terms of challenges and opportunities.

Civics for Local Government
3 Credit Hours
This class provides valuable information on the proper protocol in the display of the American flag and other flags in government buildings; appropriate recognition of the American flag when entering a room; and the proper programming of the Pledge of Allegiance and the National Anthem into city-sponsored events and other civic programs. The class also discusses the basic protocol for welcoming foreign visitors and other dignitaries. The class includes activities to make the learning meaningful for participants. Knowing what to do, why and First Amendment implications is important to our cities and our citizens.

Community and Media Relations
6 Credit Hours
Recommended for Newly Elected and First-Term Officials
This class examines the importance of building effective working relationships with the media and the role the media plays in informing the public and shaping their opinion of municipal governments. Advice for repairing poor relationships is provided, along with insights on when and how to speak with reporters, especially during times of crisis. This class is limited to 40 participants.

Conflict Resolution
6 Credit Hours
Recommended for Newly Elected and First-Term Officials
This class explores strategies and techniques for successfully resolving conflict through negotiation and mediation. Emphasis is placed on identifying the sources of conflict and the personality styles of the parties involved.

Creating a Downtown Renaissance: Advanced DDA Training
6 Credit Hours
Pre-requisite: Downtown Development Authority Basic Training This class builds on the Basic Downtown Development Au¬thority training class with an emphasis on applying down¬town development tools. The importance of developing a downtown vision and a plan are discussed. Attendees also hear the basics of navigating Business Improvement Districts, Community Improvement Districts, Tax Allocation Districts, Historic Preservation Tax Credits, the Redevelopment Powers Act and Urban Redevelopment Law. Best practice examples of utilizing federal, state and local partnerships, programs and incentives are shared. Class participants are given an opportunity to immediately apply the tools and programs highlighted in the classes through a case study exercise.

Current Issues Class - Understanding the Census
3 Credit Hours
The purpose of this class is to expand the understanding of the U.S. Census Bureau, the uses of Census data, the importance of Census 2020, and what the state of Georgia and local governments can do to ensure the most accurate count. Georgia has the opportunity to gain one or two congressional districts based on population growth. In this Current Issues Class, the role of local governments in Census 2020 is explored.

Current Issues Class: Municipal Law Update 2019
3 Credit Hours
This class updates attendees on legislation and judicial decisions affecting municipal governments. The goal of this class is to provide attendees with a detailed understanding of changes to laws affecting municipalities.

Current Issues Class: Understanding, Funding and Fighting the New Face of Homelessness in Georgia
3 Credit Hours
Homelessness has a direct impact on local government and communities across Georgia. The face of homelessness is now different than many would perceive, with families, veterans, and the working poor comprising an ever-increas¬ing percentage of those affected. In this class, an introduc¬tion to the real causes of homelessness is presented, with discussion of how homelessness financially impacts local communities. Roles, responsibilities and supportive efforts required of elected officials to face this issue along with strategies for engaging with non-profit/ faith based orga¬nizations, and opportunities for federal funding are exam¬ined. Case studies of municipalities utilizing Department of Community Affairs funding and possible municipal service structures are evaluated.

Current Issues Class: Workforce Development
6 Credit Hours
This class provides participants with information pertain¬ing to workforce trends in local government and Georgia’s workforce, as well as the role of elected officials and key players throughout our state.

Downtown Development Authority Basic Training
6 Credit Hours
This class is primarily directed at those who serve on Downtown Development Authorities, but it is open to all city officials. Topics include: management of downtown as a valuable resource; the role of the authority, board mem¬bers and staff; DDA laws; and the day-to-day operations of a Downtown Development Authority. This class is limited to 50 participants.

Economic Development
6 Credit Hours
This class provides a basic overview of the economic devel¬opment process, with a focus on the strategies, resources and programs employed by the state of Georgia to assist communities in achieving success in today’s global econ¬omy. Topics such as community development building blocks, business development strategies, regional coopera¬tion, and the role of local leadership in economic development are covered.

Economics of Education
3 Credit Hours
This class provides a basic overview of the economic devel¬opment process, with a focus on the strategies, resources and programs employed by the state of Georgia to assist communities in achieving success in today’s global econ¬omy. Topics such as community development building blocks, business development strategies, regional coopera¬tion, and the role of local leadership in economic development are covered.

Effective Practices for Municipal Operations 101
3 Credit Hours
This class targets municipal elected officials from small communities and newly elected officials and exposes them to various fundamental principles for having a professionally managed city. The class examines basic management strat¬egies and analyzes tools and processes needed to create an organizational climate of excellence for the effective delivery of municipal services. In addition, the class identi¬fies emerging issues and other challenges that can impede effective municipal operations.

Emergency Management
6 Credit Hours
This class is aimed at providing municipal officials with a general understanding of the roles of local, state and feder¬al government in responding to and helping communities recover from both natural and man-made disasters. The functions of local emergency management agencies and important legal and financial issues that arise during times of emergency and disaster are also discussed.

Employee Benefits 101 (Retirement)
3 Credit Hours
This class targets municipal elected officials and staff. It pro¬vides a general overview of retirement plans that cities can offer to employees and explains the differences between various plan types, such as defined benefit, defined con¬tribution and deferred compensation plans and how these plans function and are administered.

Entrepreneur Friendly Cities
3 Credit Hours
This class targets municipal elected officials, city management, community development specialists, economic development professionals or planning and zoning staff. The class highlights the critical role economic development plays in our cities’ growth while highlighting the purpose current ordinances and policies play in the contribution of or hindrance towards business development. Pulling from real life examples, a panel of practitioners provides attendees with both statewide and local perspectives, sharing their success stories, challenges and endorsements for how class participants can address the needs of their city’s business community. In addition, the class identifies and addresses emerging impediments and statewide trends that can negatively impact the growth and development of a city.

Environmental Sustainability
6 Credit Hours
City officials are faced with myriad environmental challeng¬es that affect quality of life, public health, and economic vitality. This class explores some of the most pressing environmental issues Georgia cities currently face – such as water quality, water quantity, energy conservation, and hazardous waste – and ways municipal officials are finding to solve them. The class will focus on projects such as green infrastructure, energy efficiency measures, and brownfields redevelopment that promote both environmental sustain¬ability as well as community revitalization. Additional topics include principles of “sustainability leadership,” how to get citizens engaged and how to communicate and promote a sustainability message.

Ethics
6 Credit Hours
Recommended for Newly Elected and First-Term Officials
This class examines the importance of ethical conduct in the administration of one’s public duties and how ethical lapses can severely damage the reputation of both individual officeholders and the city. An overview of state ethics laws and regulations that apply to municipal officials, including campaign financing and private interest disclosure requirements, is provided. Ethical dilemmas that often confront public officials and the value of strong local ethics ordinances are also discussed.

Excellence in Customer Service
3 Credit Hours
This class provides valuable information for elected of¬ficials and staff relating to the proper role that custom¬er service plays in local government. Participants will explore ways to move from average customer service to excellent customer service. Participants examine inter¬nal policies and procedures that hamper and support customer service at its best. The class instructor guides officials in defining and communicating the customer service organizational culture of their respective cities.

Fire and Emergency Medical Services
6 Credit Hours
This class exposes city officials to some of the basic concepts involved in providing municipal fire suppression, fire prevention and emergency medical services. In addition to reviewing applicable laws and codes, the class covers emerging issues and new technologies.

Governing the Commons: Collective Decision Making in Complex Systems
6 Credit Hours
Completion of the Certificate of Achievement is a pre-requisite. Making decisions within a single jurisdiction is complicated enough, but relatively simple compared to the complexity of decisions multiple jurisdictions must often make among themselves. In this class, participants explore first-hand some of the critical leadership challenges involved in collective decision making, such as: How should such decisions be made? What form should they take? How should they be governed, monitored and enforced? How should costs and benefits be allocated? This class is limited to 35 participants.

Housing Solutions for Cities — Mobile Workshop
6 Credit Hours
This class provides officials with information about housing needs and issues, as well as programs and resources available to assist communities in the area of housing. The class format is a combination of classroom and mobile workshop. The mobile workshop highlights one or more successful local housing development(s) and provides participants the opportunity to see first-hand how some of the resources and programs described during the classroom session have been utilized.

How Shall We Live? Practical Ethics for Public Life
6 Credit Hours
Completion of the Certificate of Achievement is a pre-requisite. Ethics is often seen as something that is lacking in public officials, and therefore must be imposed on them through laws and training. Ethics training may promote awareness and compliance, but it does not promote ethical excellence. In this class, participants explore the advantages and limitations of codified ethics; how values, morality, virtue, character and obligations play out in everyday decision making; why ethical dilemmas arise and how we resolve them; virtues and temptations of leadership; and how public service constitutes a moral and ethical enterprise for public leaders. This class is limited to 35 participants.

Human Resources I
6 Credit Hours
Available Online
This class provides an overview of state and federal personnel law that apply to municipal governments and the basics of human resource management. Key topics include day-to-day issues facing human resource staff, the role of the personnel manager, establishing and adhering to sound personnel policies and procedures, and dealing with the media.

Information Privacy and Security Breaches: Prevention and Response
3 Credit Hours
Elected officials are the “face” of a city’s commitment to information privacy and security. This class covers what municipal officials “need to know” about information pri¬vacy and security policies including: risk assessment, access controls, security provisions in contracts, disaster recovery / business continuity, workforce training and incident / breach readiness. Class attendees review actual municipal and county information privacy and security breaches. They also learn how to champion for the resources to secure city information and how to designate the city as a HIPAA “hybrid entity.”

6 Credit Hours
This class familiarizes municipal officials with the basic concepts of law enforcement. In addition to reviewing applicable laws, funding mechanisms and staffing models, the class addresses emerging public safety issues, trends and innovations.

Let’s Get Social
3 Credit Hours
Technology impacts personal lives, work and local govern¬ment. This class examines and defines what social media means and how social media can be used by local govern¬ment, including the risks and benefits of such usage. The le¬gal basis for governmental use of social media is reviewed. Demonstrations on making social media user-friendly for both large and small governments are provided. Finally, the class helps participants determine the social media appli¬cations that matter most to their organization, navigate the set-up process for key applications, create meaningful content and engage their audience across different sites.

Living Beyond Expectations: The Opportunities and Challenges of the Growing Senior Population
3 Credit Hours
Never in the history of humankind have we experienced a more radical population shift. Advances in technology and health care are increasing longevity for many Americans. Increased numbers of older residents is not a temporary situation that will end with any generation but rather a permanent state for communities throughout the nation. By 2029, it is estimated that persons over 65 years of age will make up 20 percent of the U.S. population. This class examines the implications of an aging population on cities and how municipal leaders can maintain and attract the older residents, a vital plank of economic vitality and development. Public administrators can play a unique role in preparing communities for residents of all ages and abilities to live healthy and independent lives. Critical components are the adoption of age-friendly practices that address fundamental aspects of housing, transportation and services through decisions about land use, zoning and investments. This session discusses ways for communities to enact change through integrated public policy, community design and engagement.

Local Government Debt Methods 101
3 Credit Hours
Available Online
This class targets municipal elected officials and staff and exposes them to various fundamental methods of issuing debt in Georgia. The class examines the history of public debt in Georgia, basic public finance principles, legal requirements and prohibitions, and various financing methods needed to effectively budget for capital improvement projects

Making Citizen Engagement Work in our Communities
6 Credit Hours
Recommended for Newly Elected and First-Term Officials
This class explores the importance of getting citizens engaged in the process of governance. The class exposes officials to the concept of deliberative forums, a method of citizen engagement that brings diverse community interests together to explore policy options and share insights, ideas and suggestions in a structured setting. Participants will receive tips, tools and other resources for recruiting citizens, creating productive conversations, and encouraging citizens to be involved in local problem solving.

Managing Growth: Economic and Natural Resource Issues
6 Credit Hours
This class shows city leaders how they can exert meaningful control over how their community grows. Topics include economic and ecological considerations, protecting water quality, regulatory initiatives and regionalization. Promoting infill development and redevelopment, preserving land and capturing private investment are also covered.

Mobile Workshops
3 or 6 Credit Hours
Mobile workshops give participants an opportunity to see first-hand how a community has addressed an issue, concern or opportunity.

Money, Money, Money … Money: Funding City Projects and Programs Through Grants and Loans
6 Credit Hours
With limited ability to generate increased revenues from taxes and user fees, city officials often seek grant and low-interest loan opportunities to help address a range of capital improvement and operational needs. This class details some of the state, federal and foundation funding sources available to municipalities in Georgia and offers advice on how to write strong grant applications. Additionally, the class introduces some reporting and administrative responsibilities the city may have once funding has been awarded.

Multi-day Economic Development Class
12 Credit Hours
This class is conducted by the Georgia Academy for Economic Development. Participants must be nominated and attend four days of training over a four-month period. Team projects are required. For information on this class, please contact the Department of Community Affairs. Participants receive 12 hours of credit through the Municipal Training Institute for successfully completing this class.

Municipal Courts Post-Ferguson I: Promoting Justice, Protecting City Assets
3 Credit Hours
This class reviews how municipal courts are required by law to handle common offenses, such as traffic offenses, certain misdemeanors and municipal ordinance violations. Designed for municipal elected officials and city/assistant city managers, it addresses court practices that have led to class actions and investigations across the country. In addition to a basic knowledge of the role of the judge, court clerk, prosecutor, probation service provider and city leadership, attendees leave class with a self-assessment and set of model documents. These tools help officials ensure that the courts are promoting justice and supporting public safety, and are not jeopardizing the city’s “brand” and exposing the city to financial harm.

Municipal Electric Systems 101
3 Credit Hours
This class is open only to officials from the 52 Georgia cities that own and operate public power systems. Electric utilities are multi-million dollar enterprises and it is essential that policymakers and key staff have a strong understanding of all aspects of the service—including generation, transmission and distribution—as well as sound financial and management practices. In addition to providing a basic overview of municipal electric system operations, the class is designed to help attendees understand the role of the Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia and Electric Cities of Georgia and the services and resources each organization provides to participating systems.

Municipal Finance I
6 Credit Hours
Recommended for Newly Elected and First-Term Officials
This class is intended to serve as a basic primer on municipal finance issues that all mayors, councilmembers and managers should understand. A discussion of the budget process, the revenue sources available to cities, purchasing policies and financing capital improvements is included in this general overview.

Municipal Finance II
6 Credit Hours
This class emphasizes the importance of establishing sound financial policies and provides participants with a better understanding of how to read and understand audited city financial statements, assess the effectiveness of internal accounting controls and manage a city’s cash and investments. This class may be taken before or after Municipal Finance I.

Municipal Gas Systems 101
3 Credit Hours
This class is open only to officials from the 84 Georgia cities that own and operate a municipal gas system. In addition to providing a basic overview of municipal gas system operations, the class is designed to help attendees understand the role of the GMA Gas Section and Municipal Gas Authority of Georgia and the services and resources provided to participating systems. The class also informs and educates municipal officials on the continued safe and efficient operation of the natural gas system. It is important that key officials become aware of state and federal regulations and the issues of an aging infrastructure.

Municipal Law
6 Credit Hours
Recommended for Newly Elected and First-Term Officials
This class provides an overview of the major sources of municipal authority and the limitations on that authority, including constitutional and statutory law. Municipal charters and ordinances are discussed and participants are encouraged to read their city’s charter before attending this class. How to enter into legal contracts is reviewed. This class also provides a basic foundation for understanding the liability and immunity of cities, elected officials and municipal employees. If time permits, this course may also address working with the city attorney.

Municipal Taxation 101 - The Basics
3 Credit Hours
New Class
The class gives municipal officials an overview of the fundamentals of local government taxation with an in-depth look at the two primary funding sources for local government in Georgia: property tax and sales tax. This class is designed to give participants an understanding of tax language and appropriate usage of revenues, preparing them to communicate tax issues to constituents and make prudent decisions related to expenditures.

Municipal Taxation 102 – The Basics Continued
3 Credit Hours
The class gives municipal officials a broad understanding of local government taxation with an in-depth look at excise taxes related to alcohol, lodging, rental vehicles and energy used in manufacturing, as well as business occupation tax (formerly known as business licenses). Participants gain an understanding of tax language and appropriate use of revenues, preparing them to communicate tax issues to constituents and make prudent decisions related to expenditures. This class includes information from the old 6 hour Taxation 101-The Basics class.

Municipal Water and Wastewater Systems
3 Credit Hours
Water and wastewater services are fundamental to the oper¬ation of a city. This class provides an overview of the man¬agement of these services and introduces participants to the significant role of water in community health, quality of life and economic development. This class also describes various service delivery methods and discusses the challenges and opportunities that municipal officials face in providing water and wastewater services to their customers.

6 Credit Hours
New Class
All organizations, institutions, associations, and jurisdictions must respond to change, either because they happen to change or change happens to them. This is why virtually every city and town engages in some form of what is commonly referred to as strategic planning. But having a strategic plan and thinking strategically are not the same. If they were, so many so-called strategic plans wouldn’t sit on the shelf. Municipal leaders must be able to engage colleagues, constituents, citizens, and their community in strategic thinking if they are to address not only the challenges facing them today, but also those of tomorrow. This class uses a strategic simulation that incorporates strategic thinking, visioning, and navigating to address the what, why, and how of strategic planning. Class participants work together in small groups to simulate a strategic process that includes an environmental scan, building scenarios of most likely and most preferred futures, identifying driving and restraining forces, conducting a gap analysis, identifying key themes, framing goals and strategies, and developing an action plan to guide how to navigate from today to tomorrow. This class is limited to 35 participants.

Open Meetings
3 Credit Hours
Available Online
Recommended for Newly Elected and First-Term Officials
Open, accessible meetings are a hallmark of local govern¬ment and are important for communicating with residents and businesses. This class examines the requirements of Georgia’s Open Meetings Act, what constitutes a “meeting,” and the limited circumstances authorizing executive ses¬sions. The importance of proper notice as well as meeting agendas, summaries and minutes are discussed. Class par¬ticipants are apprised of potential consequences for failing to follow the law.

Open Records
3 Credit Hours
Available Online
Recommended for Newly Elected and First-Term Officials
This class familiarizes municipal officials with Georgia’s open records law and the potential consequences for failing to adhere to it. Hypothetical scenarios are used to give participants a better understanding of their responsibilities and obligations for complying with these statutes. Records management and the requirements of the Georgia Records Act are reviewed as well as legal obligations for preserving records for litigation.

Planning and Zoning
6 Credit Hours
This class examines the difficult choices municipal officials encounter in stimulating economic well-being, protecting public infrastructure investment and maintaining environmental integrity. It examines legal considerations for planning and zoning, the role of the mayor and council and practical steps for maintaining a comprehensive plan and effective zoning procedures. In addition, the class highlights issues, barriers and policy solutions associated with efforts to achieve desirable patterns of development.

Practices for Successful Meetings
3 Credit Hours
Recommended for Newly Elected and First-Term Officials
The success of a city is often gauged by how its residents perceive city council meetings. This class is designed to give elected officials and others a practical understanding of the most commonly-used procedures available to govern meetings. The basic tenants of Robert’s Rules of Order, as well as alternatives to Robert’s, are taught in a manner that seeks to arm presiding officials with the tools necessary to run successful and productive gatherings of their elected officials and other meetings necessary to operate their cities.

Public Policy Development and Implementation
3 Credit Hours
Recommended for Newly Elected and First-Term Officials
Developing policy to advance the vision of the city is one of the most important duties that a mayor and council perform. This class is designed to give municipal officials an understanding of the importance of that function and the role of the elected officials and professional staff in developing, implementing and evaluating those policies. Participants learn how to effectively use policy-making models in the development of practical public policy that will benefit their communities and constituents.

Public Presentations and Meet the Media
6 Credit Hours
This class teaches municipal officials how to be more effective when speaking to groups or addressing the media. Techniques for developing presentation content and delivery, as well as tips for more effectively dealing with the media, are shared. As part of the class, participants make a brief presentation to their fellow classmates.

Public Problems, Democratic Decisions - The Governing Role of Mayors and Councilmembers
6 Credit Hours
Public officials will explore the democratic context of leading and governing. It addresses the role of elected officials in a democratic society, the relationship between elected and appointed officials, the core values underlying public problems and choices, and the reasons why councils can make better choices than individuals. The goals of this class are to help public officials better understand their roles in leading and governing their communities, to develop a better understanding of what councils do and why, and to develop practical skills in public problem solving and decision making. Participants learn how to use public problems to discuss the kind of community they want to build and how to ensure that their choices and decisions preserve the fundamental goals of our democratic society.

Public Works and Transportation
3 Credit Hours
Public works services, including transportation, are fundamental to the operation of a city. This session introduces participants to the types of services provided through public works departments and the important role those services play in community health, quality of life and economic development.

Recreation and Parks – Building Communities
3 Credit Hours
Recreation and park programs and facilities play an important role in creating a high quality of life for communities. They create public value by offering recreational activities, green-space for relaxation and opportunities for improving the health of residents. However, recreation and park programs are sometimes seen as amenities that cities cannot afford. This session explores the role of recreation and parks in building community and economic development, and options for funding.

Regional Approaches to Cooperation
6 Credit Hours
Municipal governments face many challenges today in delivering services to their citizens with resources that continue to diminish. These challenges have provided new opportunities for cities to work across jurisdictional boundaries to effectively support community and economic development efforts, as well as many other local projects and programs. This cooperation can be accomplished through informal and formal agreements, and partnerships may extend to public, non-profit and private sector entities. This class examines the concept of regional cooperation, tools for implementation, opportunities to explore best practices around the state and strategies for establishing successful regional partnerships.

Retreats
Up to 12 Credit Hours
Retreats provide an opportunity for city councils to come together, apart from the regular meetings, to prepare for the future. The focus may be on teamwork, goal setting, or other city concerns. Each retreat is tailored to meet the individual city’s needs. Credit is given for city council retreats facilitated by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government. Some cities have an annual retreat, but credit toward the Municipal Training Institute certificate program is given for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

Revitalizing Neighborhoods – Tools for Local Officials
6 Credit Hours
This class provides an overview of the tools and resources available to cities interested in effectively responding to neighborhood problems such as dilapidated and unsafe structures, unsightly property, junk automobiles, weeds, trash and other nuisances. Topics include Georgia’s Urban Redevelopment law, code enforcement and land bank authorities.

Risk and Insurance 101
3 Credit Hours
This interactive class provides an introduction to the concepts of risk management and insurance as they relate to municipalities. The class focuses on real world best practices involving risk avoidance, reduction and transfer through purchasing insurance, safety training, claims mitigation and implementation of proper policies and procedures. The participant will leave with a better understanding of ways to save money, provide for a safer environment and techniques to avoid many of the pitfalls that put your city and staff at risk. Subject matter experts will present this information through interactive classroom instruction and group problem solving sessions.

Robert E. Knox, Jr. Municipal Leadership Institute
6 Credit Hours
This class is an intensive multi-day event that focuses on helping city officials enhance and sharpen their leadership skills. Enrollment is limited so that participants can have a full exchange of ideas with instructors and other municipal officials. Completion of the Municipal Leadership Institute is required for municipal elected officials to receive a Certificate of Excellence, Certificate of Distinction and Certificate of Dedication.

Roles and Responsibilities of Council and Staff
3 Credit Hours
Recommended for Newly Elected and First-Term Officials
While municipal elected officials have the responsibility to develop policies to effectively address complex issues and problems that are often unique to cities, they typically must rely on public sector employees to implement them. In this class, the different perspectives of council and staff are explored in order to identify ways for them to collaborate in addressing public problems.

Strong Communities – Strong Families
3 Credit Hours
Georgia communities and national studies confirm that the well-being of children and families directly impacts the vitality of a community and its economy. Municipal officials have learned that they can improve the outcomes for their community’s children and families. This class addresses the interplay of community, economic and human development. It focuses on helping local leadership assess their community’s indicators of child and family well-being, how to integrate resources on priority community problems and effective municipal strategies to coalesce the public will to create improvements.

Water Management — An Introduction for Local Governments
6 Credit Hours
Water quality and water quantity are of vital importance and can provide some of the most challenging issues facing all levels of government in Georgia. Planning to meet water needs on the local level while also considering the needs of those who share the resource can be difficult. In 2011, in response to the Georgia State-wide Water Management Plan, Regional Water Plans were adopted throughout the State that provided recommendations to help address water quality and quantity issues at myriad levels, across myriad sectors. This class provides background on that process, presents issues highlighted in the plans and discusses ways in which local governments can secure their water future. It also includes an overview of the regulatory processes related to water management and water planning.

CONTACT INFORMATION
For more information on GMA training opportunities, please contact:
  • Aileen Harris at (678) 686-6293 or AHarris at gmanet.com 
Course Presentations